Anna Flanagan (hockeyroos gold medallist) reliability testing

Sport scientists work with Hockeyroos to prevent knee injuries

Friday, 15 August 2014

A new training program devised by researchers at The University of Western Australia has significantly reduced the risk of knee injuries among the Australian Commonwealth Games gold medal-winning women's hockey team, the Hockeyroos.

Jessica Pengelly

UWA graduates and student set for Commonwealth Games

Monday, 21 July 2014

The University of Western Australia will have one student and three graduates representing Australia when the 2014 Commonwealth Games starts in the Scottish city of Glasgow this Wednesday.

Better fun than being on holiday for Indigenous kids keen on science

Thursday, 3 July 2014

School holidays? What school holidays?

Fifty Indigenous students in Years 9 and 10 will be having a different kind of fun when school breaks up at the end of the week - including learning about designing a world championship-winning racing car, launching rockets, extracting DNA from strawberries, experimenting with liquid nitrogen, making moulds of teeth and challenging their sporting abilities.

An SMS a day keeps the doctor away

Wednesday, 4 June 2014

Habit-based messages by text message or email have proven to increase the fruit consumption of young adults according to Australian research.

Motherhood and childcare: is it just a pain in the back?

Thursday, 29 May 2014

A world-first study by a researcher from The University of Western Australia is calling for volunteers to help unravel why being a mum may cause years of back pain and dysfunction.

Changing running technique could cause more harm than good

Thursday, 13 February 2014

Changing your running technique from a rearfoot strike (landing on your heel first) to a forefoot strike (landing on the ball of your foot first) might not offer the performance and injury avoidance benefits that running blogs would have you believe.

Dr Louise Naylor

High-intensity videogaming good for kids' health: study

Friday, 17 May 2013

High-intensity active video games are good for children's health, according to a team of researchers from The University of Western Australia.