Nobel laureate seeks volunteers for potentially ground-breaking study

Tuesday, 9 October 2007
Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall is seeking volunteers to take part in a potentially ground-breaking study.

The study aims to find out if people develop immunity against a common stomach infection called Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori.

Prof Marshall and colleagues at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital believe H. pylori could be used to create a new super-vaccine if they can prove people never become immune to it.

Nobel Laureate Prof Barry Marshall to announce new study

Tuesday, 9 October 2007

11:15hrs Tuesday 9 October 2007
Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands
All media welcome

Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall will announce details of a new study at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital on Tuesday 9 October.

He will also call for volunteers to take part in the study which aims to determine if people develop immunity to a common stomach infection called Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori or if they are always open to re-infection.

UWA programs win national awards

Monday, 8 October 2007

Three outstanding teaching and learning programs at The University of Western Australia have been recognised with 2007 Carrick Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning.

UWA Vice-Chancellor Alan Robson said the awards rewarded the efforts of individual staff members to enhance the quality of student learning.

“UWA staff have a well-deserved reputation for excellence and quality teaching and it is particularly pleasing to see staff rewarded for their commitment in winning three out of 14 institutional awards,” Professor Robson said.

New research funding awarded to help find cane toad Achille's heel

Friday, 5 October 2007

WA researchers have hailed the Carpenter Government’s decision to provide extra funding for a project that could deliver a biological answer to stopping cane toads entering the State.

After boom, what next? asks WA's chief scientist at UWA

Thursday, 4 October 2007
We are enjoying an economic boom but, when this abates, we will depend on our ingenuity and innovation, underpinned by scientific know-how, according to Western Australia’s Chief Scientist, Professor Lyn Beazley.

Professor Beazley will give a free public lecture, Science Matters for the Future of Western Australia, at The University of Western Australia, in the University Club’s Theatre Auditorium, at 6pm on Tuesday (October 9) as part of the annual Karrakatta Club address.

UWA welcomes $9M federal government grants

Wednesday, 3 October 2007

Two Federal Government Capital Development Pool grants of $3 million for The University of Western Australia’s new Business School, and $1 million for its Albany Centre, were a welcome and significant contribution to the State’s infrastructure, Vice-Chancellor Professor Alan Robson said today.

“The Federal Government’s $3 million grant towards the construction of our new $47 million business school is a significant contribution to UWA’s ability to further enhance the quality of its business education programs,” Professor Robson said.

UWA joins Rotary in 50th birthday celebrations

Wednesday, 3 October 2007

Without the support of Rotary Western Australia, this State might not be celebrating the 50th anniversary of The University of Western Australia’s Medical School this year.

This special long-term relationship between Rotary and the Medical school will be commemorated on Wednesday, October 31, 2007, at 6pm with the unveiling of a plaque by the Governor, Dr Ken Michael, also a Rotarian.

UWA researcher tackles trading hours

Wednesday, 3 October 2007
With debate about WA’s retail trading hours hotting up as the Christmas rush draws near, The University of Western Australia has appointed a researcher to tackle the issue.

After studying women’s involvement with Australian Rules football for her PhD thesis, Dr Deborah Hindley, recently appointed Research Fellow for UWA’s Centre for Advanced Consumer Research, is now taking on the emotive issue of shopping hours.

Maths whiz kids battle it out at UWA

Tuesday, 2 October 2007

Running, long jump, shot put, javelin, boxing and equestrian events were almost all that were on offer when the Olympic Games began in ancient Greece about 3000 years ago.

“If they were alive today, the Greek mathematicians Euclid and Pythagoras would probably be delighted to know that The University of Western Australia has its own version of the old games,” UWA’s Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics, Professor Cheryl Praeger, said.

Music for life, UWA for music

Tuesday, 2 October 2007

Mozart said that to stop music would be to stop time and Dumbledore, JK Rowling’s wizard headmaster, acknowledged that music was more magical than magic itself. With that in mind, The University of Western Australia’s School of Music is keeping up with the times with its exciting new Music for Life program.

Music and medicine, music psychology, ethno-musicology, music theatre and opera studies are just some of the vibrant and inclusive courses beginning next year.