Pre-historic earth yields valuable new secrets for UWA scientists

Wednesday, 17 October 2007

Ancient nickel-iron sulphide deposits, which are some of our most valuable mineral resources, provide important clues to help us understand the operation of the Earth’s systems more than 2.5 billion years ago.

Formed at a time when there was no oxygen and no complex life, these clues can help us find more deposits, according to Professor Mark Barley of the Centre for Exploration Targeting in The University of Western Australia’s School of Earth and Geographical Sciences.

UWA researchers tackle energy crisis with plants

Monday, 15 October 2007

Scientists at The University of Western Australia are racing against the clock to find plants that will provide bio-energy and bio-fuels and be able to perform under the environmental extremes predicted with climate change.

And an inconspicuous, aesthetically-challenged weed, Arabidopsis thaliana (or thale or mouse-eared cress) is offering vital information to researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Plant Metabolomics, to be opened at 4pm today (Monday, October 15, 2007) at UWA, by the Minister for Energy, Resources, Industry and Innovation, Fran Logan.

Rural Clinical School wins national award

Monday, 15 October 2007

The University of Western Australia’s Rural Clinical School has won a prestigious 2007 Carrick Award for its Clinical Learning Embedded in Rural Communities Program.

The program was recognised in the Innovation in Curricula, Learning and Teaching category of the Carrick Awards, which acknowledge the vital contribution made by individuals and teams to the quality of student learning in Australia.

Can Australia successfully export democracy?

Friday, 12 October 2007

Join Carmen Lawrence at The University of Western Australia’s UWA Extension public lecture Exporting Democracy, Monday 7 – 8.30pm, October 29, 2007.

Join Carmen Lawrence at a public lecture where she will raise questions about freedom and the modern democracy divide between areas of the world still governed by dictatorships and monarchs and the Australian political system. Can democracy successfully be exported?

Top scientist to focus on sea level changes in public lecture

Friday, 12 October 2007
One of Australia’s leading geophysicists will tackle the hot topic of changing sea levels in a free public talk – the Joseph Gentilli Memorial Lecture – at The University of Western Australia next week.

Professor Kurt Lambeck, President of the Australian Academy of Science, will review past changes in sea level and the implications for glaciations and past shoreline reconstructions in his lecture Sea level change through the ages: Learning from the past to understand the future.

Symposium marks end of celebrations for Medical School's 50th Anniversary

Friday, 12 October 2007

A unique event which is set to explore the future 50 years of medical research in Western Australia is planned for the culmination of The University of Western Australia’s Medical School’s golden anniversary.

The research symposium entitled Medical Research: Securing the Future Health of our State, will involve a number of high profile international, national and local speakers and is open to the public.

Pushing back agricultural frontiers

Thursday, 11 October 2007
Eight PhD students from four schools within the Institute of Agriculture at the Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences (FNAS) at The University of Western Australia (UWA) recently presented their research to an audience of 60 in a post-graduate showcase, ‘Frontiers in Agriculture and Resource Management’.

Focussing on innovative land management and animal production systems, as well as plant production for the future, the sessions were an opportunity to showcase high quality research and for students to interact with the industry and potential employers.

Nobel laureate seeks volunteers for potentially ground-breaking study

Tuesday, 9 October 2007
Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall is seeking volunteers to take part in a potentially ground-breaking study.

The study aims to find out if people develop immunity against a common stomach infection called Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori.

Prof Marshall and colleagues at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital believe H. pylori could be used to create a new super-vaccine if they can prove people never become immune to it.

Nobel Laureate Prof Barry Marshall to announce new study

Tuesday, 9 October 2007

11:15hrs Tuesday 9 October 2007
Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands
All media welcome

Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall will announce details of a new study at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital on Tuesday 9 October.

He will also call for volunteers to take part in the study which aims to determine if people develop immunity to a common stomach infection called Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori or if they are always open to re-infection.

UWA programs win national awards

Monday, 8 October 2007

Three outstanding teaching and learning programs at The University of Western Australia have been recognised with 2007 Carrick Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning.

UWA Vice-Chancellor Alan Robson said the awards rewarded the efforts of individual staff members to enhance the quality of student learning.

“UWA staff have a well-deserved reputation for excellence and quality teaching and it is particularly pleasing to see staff rewarded for their commitment in winning three out of 14 institutional awards,” Professor Robson said.