Quantum computing explained at UWA public lecture

Friday, 9 November 2007
Many of us started learning by counting on our fingers – and sometimes on our toes too. Today’s computers are very good at doing this simple counting very quickly.

But, as you can discover at The University of Western Australia next week, future computers are likely to use the strange properties of quantum mechanics – such as objects being in two places at once – to solve problems that are impossible with conventional computers.

Mathematical modelling suggests 'strategic' seradella

Wednesday, 7 November 2007
Like playing chess, outwitting annual ryegrass, a major weed in WA which can develop resistance to more than one herbicide at a time, requires constant vigilance and a strategic approach.

Farmers now have a greater understanding of the value of pasture phases for controlling herbicide-resistant annual ryegrass in low to medium rainfall areas, thanks to Graeme Doole from the School of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Institute of Agriculture, at The University of Western Australia (UWA).

Noongar people team with UWA to look back in time

Tuesday, 6 November 2007

Noongar people who are descendants of some of the earliest inhabitants of south-western Australia are learning about the lives their ancestors might have led, with help from a team of archaeologists at The University of Western Australia.

Dr Joe Dortch from UWA is part of an Australian Research Council linkage project to explore the ways Noongar people have changed the landscape over the past 6000 years.

UWA Arts/Law graduate is 2008 Rhodes Scholar

Saturday, 3 November 2007

A wealth of experiences, from returning to a war-torn Yugoslavia that his parents had left in the 1970s to working with Aboriginal communities, have helped shape the strong moral convictions and commitment to human rights that characterise University of WA graduate Daniel Vujcich, who has been selected as the 2008 Rhodes Scholar for Western Australia.

Learn about the ghost in your genes at UWA

Saturday, 3 November 2007

New cancer treatments that are much less toxic to the patient have resulted from the latest research into the complexity of the disease. In the last few years, scientists and doctors have found that tiny chemical tags in our bodies, which researchers call ‘ghosts’, accumulate over time and turn genes on or off.

Stanford University hosts UWA's SymbioticA

Friday, 2 November 2007

Stanford University plays host to SymbioticA’s co-founder and Artistic Director Oron Catts, and Academic Co-ordinator Ionat Zurr, for four weeks, in an exciting, ground-breaking, and innovative exchange between Stanford University and The University of Western Australia.

UWA's SymbioticA on show in San Francisco

Friday, 2 November 2007

San Francisco is showcasing SymbioticA’s highly acclaimed research group the Tissue Culture & Art Project’s latest artwork, NoArk. Held at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, BioTechnique features an international selection of artworks that have been “grown” rather than manufactured.

Rewriting Australia - where do we come from and where might we be going?

Monday, 29 October 2007
One of Australia’s leading scholars of Australian Studies will give a free public lecture at The University of Western Australia on Wednesday (October 31) on what it means to think and write as Australians.

Professor Peter Beilharz, Professor in Sociology and Australian Studies at La Trobe University, will present his lecture Rewriting Australia in which he asks whether Australians are the bearers of a strong national narrative, or whether we rather tell stories governed by closer spheres of colony, city and region. He also considerers the

Logged-on Gen Y bloggers get philosophical at UWA

Friday, 26 October 2007

Most of them own a mobile and a computer, they’re often logged on 24/7, they usually have their own blog and a 2007 survey of Australian employers found they’re bad spellers, don’t bother with grammar and have little understanding of how to behave at work.

Science awards honour UWA research and teaching

Friday, 26 October 2007

The breadth of scientific research talent within The University of Western Australia has been confirmed with the announcement of Professor David Blair as Western Australian Scientist of the Year, Dr Kristen Nowak as Western Australian Young Scientist of the Year and Professor Paul McMenamin winning the Excellence in Science Teaching Award.

Premier Alan Carpenter last night announced the winners of the Premier’s Science Awards, which recognise outstanding achievements in Western Australian science.