Test tubes

Developed world must not fear sending Ebola help

Thursday, 30 October 2014

The global community would be better served by fighting the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, rather than waiting for it to come knocking on our own doors, according to a medical microbiologist at The University of Western Australia.

Professor Tim Inglis

UWA scientist urges Australia to send Ebola help

Thursday, 30 October 2014

A medical microbiologist at The University of Western Australia says the developed world must not fear sending people to help efforts to control Ebola in Africa.

An exciting world of research at UWA

Monday, 27 October 2014

Where in the world can you listen to discussions about new therapies to treat cancer, use supercomputers to solve challenges in chemistry, learn how plants grow in infertile soils and about new computer techniques to reveal patterns in Shakespeare?

Professor Hans Nossent, Chair of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Medicine

$2.7M to target 'poor cousin' of chronic diseases

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Whether it's the 11-year-old who has to sit by while his schoolmates play soccer, the grandma who can't open a jar, or the 30-year-old who can't get out of bed and has to miss yet another week of work - everyone knows someone affected by arthritis or some equally painful bone and joint condition.

Associate Professor Kevin Pfleger

UWA awarded $26.1M in national medical research funding

Friday, 17 October 2014

A trial that aims to improve the treatment of severe asthma in children, how microRNAs can be used to treat liver cancer and improving primary care for Aboriginal mothers and babies in the Kimberley are among 29 research projects at The University of Western Australia to benefit from new medical grants.

Australian scientists prove link between viral infection and autoimmune disease

Thursday, 16 October 2014

Common viral infections can pave the way to autoimmune disease, Australian scientists have revealed in breakthrough research published internationally today.

How malaria is shaping the human genome

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

For millennia, malaria has been a major killer of children in Africa and other parts of the world.  In doing so, it has been a major force of evolutionary selection on the human genome.

Professor Osvaldo Almeida

Psychiatrist wins Mental Health Good Outcomes award

Thursday, 9 October 2014

A renowned leader in psychiatry and ageing has been recognised for excellence in research with a prestigious Mental Health Good Outcomes Award.

Coffee: if you're not shaking, you need another cup

Tuesday, 7 October 2014

A team of researchers, including one from The University of Western Australia, has found there may be some truth in the slogan: "Coffee: If you're not shaking, you need another cup."  They've identified the genes that determine just how much satisfaction you can get from caffeine.

Winthrop Professor Wendy Erber

Journey from stem cell to blood cell revealed

Friday, 26 September 2014

Researchers have discovered previously undetected steps in the process by which stem cells become blood cells, a process called haematopoiesis.  An international collaboration, including Winthrop Professor Wendy Erber, has established that a highly complex series of events determine the fate of closely related populations of blood progenitor cells.

Woolly mammoth genome sequencer at UWA

Monday, 22 September 2014

How can a giant woolly mammoth which lived at least 200,000 years ago help to save the Tasmanian Devil from extinction?  The answer lies in DNA, the carrier of genetic information.

Gift gives hope to Alzheimer's sufferers

Friday, 19 September 2014

A charity set up by a self-made Mandurah businessman who left Perth at the age of 14 has donated $150,000 to help find better ways to treat depression in people with Alzheimer's disease.

Winthrop Professor Denise Chalmers, Professor Jane Heyworth and Ms Jo Hocking

UWA trio receive sector's highest level of teaching recognition

Thursday, 18 September 2014

An expert in enhancing teaching and learning in higher education, an environmental epidemiologist who enables students to become well-rounded practitioners, and the coordinator of a program that matches students with industry professionals were this week recognised with prestigious awards.

Professor Yee Leung

Ovarian cancer remains elusive to early diagnosis and successful treatment

Monday, 15 September 2014

A population-based study of all ovarian cancer cases diagnosed in Australia in 2005 found a crude five year survival rate of 35 per cent.

Lee Nedkoff

Study reveals heart health improving for diabetics

Tuesday, 9 September 2014

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that the rate of heart attacks in Western Australians with diabetes has declined substantially during the past decade despite a rapid rise in the prevalence of diabetes.

$3 Million in child health research grants

Wednesday, 3 September 2014

A study into treating life-threatening allergies is among 15 child and adolescent research projects led by scientists from The University of Western Australia that have shared in $3million in State Government funding.

Winthrop Professor David Mackey

WA researchers working towards new treatment for glaucoma

Monday, 1 September 2014

Western Australian researchers have played an important role in a major international collaboration to discover genes for glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness.

Babies at mothers' group

Groups, communities help new parents cope: studies

Thursday, 28 August 2014

Parenthood is a significant life transition; a time often experienced by new parents as overwhelming and emotionally and physically exhausting - and new research into families in Perth's newer suburbs suggests that mothers' groups and play groups play a vital role in helping new mothers feel less isolated and anxious.

Illustration of brain

Could your brain be reprogrammed to work better?

Wednesday, 6 August 2014

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have shown that electromagnetic stimulation can alter brain organisation which may make your brain work better.

Microscope in a needle team

Microscope in a needle an award finalist

Friday, 1 August 2014

The world's smallest microscope - which can fit into a needle and is capable of detecting cancer cells often missed by surgeons - has earned its inventors at The University of Western Australia a place in the finals of the 2014 WA Innovator of the Year Awards.