Less privileged kids shine at uni: study

Friday, 19 December 2014

Australia's higher education system appeared to level the playing field in terms of academic achievement for students, regardless of their socio-economic status (SES) background, according to a new study.

Barry Marshall most popular living Nobel Laureate

Friday, 12 December 2014

Professor Barry Marshall - The University of Western Australia's Nobel Prize winner - is currently the most popular living Nobel Laureate, according to the Nobel Foundation.

Renal specialist takes up blood pressure fight

Friday, 5 December 2014

A specialist from The University of Western Australia who is at the forefront of research into high blood pressure (hypertension) will spearhead efforts to develop preventive strategies to reduce death and disability from cardiovascular disease.

Professor Fiona Bull and Prince William

Public health expert receives MBE from Prince William

Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Professor Fiona Bull, Director of The University of Western Australia's Centre for the Built Environment and Health, was this week presented with her MBE in London by HRH Prince William.

Hippocratic Oath rural students

Rise in UWA rural and Indigenous medical graduates continues

Wednesday, 26 November 2014

For the third consecutive year more rural medical graduates than ever before took their professional oath at The University of Western Australia at the weekend as numbers continue to rise under UWA's successful Rural Student Recruitment Program.

Kimberley Chung, Sarah Kingston, Professor Ian Puddey (Dean, Faculty of Medicine

First Broadway access students to take Hippocratic Oath

Tuesday, 25 November 2014

The first three students to complete the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree through The University of Western Australia's Broadway access program committed to the Hippocratic Oath at the weekend (Saturday 22 November).

Professor Phil Ainslie

Lectures full of brainy ideas

Thursday, 20 November 2014

For its size, the brain needs more oxygen than any other organ in the body - but many factors can interrupt its oxygen supply.

Professor Ryan Lister

Historic first for medical research fellowships

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Australia's most prestigious mid-career medical research fellowships have been awarded to three talented young scientists who are likely to have an enormous impact on future medical research.

(Left to right) Christobel Saunders, David Sampson and Robert McLaughlin

UWA scoops innovation prizes for medical breakthroughs

Thursday, 6 November 2014

The University of Western Australia might be the oldest university in the State, but its researchers are leading the way in new technologies, taking out major prizes in the 2014 WA Innovator of the Year Awards for inventions that will improve the health of millions of people worldwide.

Professor Osvaldo Almeida

Outcomes for the mentally ill do not improve with age

Monday, 3 November 2014

New research has confirmed that people with severe mental disorders who reach older age have lower life expectancy compared with their peers.

Test tubes

Developed world must not fear sending Ebola help

Thursday, 30 October 2014

The global community would be better served by fighting the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, rather than waiting for it to come knocking on our own doors, according to a medical microbiologist at The University of Western Australia.

Professor Tim Inglis

UWA scientist urges Australia to send Ebola help

Thursday, 30 October 2014

A medical microbiologist at The University of Western Australia says the developed world must not fear sending people to help efforts to control Ebola in Africa.

An exciting world of research at UWA

Monday, 27 October 2014

Where in the world can you listen to discussions about new therapies to treat cancer, use supercomputers to solve challenges in chemistry, learn how plants grow in infertile soils and about new computer techniques to reveal patterns in Shakespeare?

Professor Hans Nossent, Chair of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Medicine

$2.7M to target 'poor cousin' of chronic diseases

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Whether it's the 11-year-old who has to sit by while his schoolmates play soccer, the grandma who can't open a jar, or the 30-year-old who can't get out of bed and has to miss yet another week of work - everyone knows someone affected by arthritis or some equally painful bone and joint condition.

Associate Professor Kevin Pfleger

UWA awarded $26.1M in national medical research funding

Friday, 17 October 2014

A trial that aims to improve the treatment of severe asthma in children, how microRNAs can be used to treat liver cancer and improving primary care for Aboriginal mothers and babies in the Kimberley are among 29 research projects at The University of Western Australia to benefit from new medical grants.

Australian scientists prove link between viral infection and autoimmune disease

Thursday, 16 October 2014

Common viral infections can pave the way to autoimmune disease, Australian scientists have revealed in breakthrough research published internationally today.

How malaria is shaping the human genome

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

For millennia, malaria has been a major killer of children in Africa and other parts of the world.  In doing so, it has been a major force of evolutionary selection on the human genome.

Professor Osvaldo Almeida

Psychiatrist wins Mental Health Good Outcomes award

Thursday, 9 October 2014

A renowned leader in psychiatry and ageing has been recognised for excellence in research with a prestigious Mental Health Good Outcomes Award.

Coffee: if you're not shaking, you need another cup

Tuesday, 7 October 2014

A team of researchers, including one from The University of Western Australia, has found there may be some truth in the slogan: "Coffee: If you're not shaking, you need another cup."  They've identified the genes that determine just how much satisfaction you can get from caffeine.

Winthrop Professor Wendy Erber

Journey from stem cell to blood cell revealed

Friday, 26 September 2014

Researchers have discovered previously undetected steps in the process by which stem cells become blood cells, a process called haematopoiesis.  An international collaboration, including Winthrop Professor Wendy Erber, has established that a highly complex series of events determine the fate of closely related populations of blood progenitor cells.