Law and public policy under the spotlight at UWA

Wednesday, 19 September 2007

Workplace relations law, native title legislation, enactments dealing with the confiscation of proceeds of crime and the debate surrounding the Bills of Rights: these are just some of the issues to be discussed at the Australian Law Teachers Association Conference at The University of Western Australia next week.

Western Australia’s Attorney General Jim McGinty, will open the conference, which runs from September 23 – 26, 2007.

The conference’s theme, ‘Law and Public Policy: Taming the Unruly Horse?’ has drawn influential experts including:

New research unlocks the role of plant colour in environmental and human health

Thursday, 13 September 2007

Have you ever found yourself wondering about the bright colours in flowers, and where those colours come from and why?

Yes, they are important in attracting insects to pollinate them – and attractive to the human eye - but that’s only a tiny part of the story.

Insider to reveal China's future in UWA public lecture

Tuesday, 11 September 2007

As the pace of change in China amazes even the most seasoned watchers, China commentator Chris Gill will offer an insight into what future holds for China at a public lecture at The University of Western Australia next week.

Mr Gill’s lecture - ‘Reading China through the Tea Leaves: Knowing the Present to See the Future’ - will provide a broad overview of the major economic and social trends in China and projections, based on extensive research, as to how things may develop in the next 20 years.

UWA astrophysicists predict most dangerous explosions

Monday, 10 September 2007
A team of astrophysicists at The University of Western Australia today announced results from a new computer program that predicts when potentially dangerous bursts of gamma radiation may hit our planet.

The results of the work from the team, consisting of PhD student Eric Howell, research fellow Dr David Coward, and academics Dr Ron Burman and Professor David Blair, from UWA’s School of Physics are published today in the prestigious journal, Astrophysical Journal Letters (vol. 666 n2).

Medical Research Institute celebrates 10 year milestone

Friday, 7 September 2007

Now a central part of the State's scientific community and the leader of a new project changing the landscape of medical research in WA, the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) has much to celebrate in its 10th anniversary year.

WAIMR Director Professor Peter Klinken said while the Institute would be reflecting on its important history throughout 2008, it was also keeping more than a keen eye on the future.

UWA professor in quest for dawn of creation

Thursday, 6 September 2007

Detecting the very first light from the first star will enable us to witness the dawn of creation according to Peter Quinn, Professor of Astronomy at The University of Western Australia, who will present a fascinating insight into the most recent advances in his field at the 2007 Ian Constable Lecture next week.

This development is thanks to a new telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). WA is the front-runner in an international competition to host the SKA.

New media transforms creativity, says UWA-visiting critic

Thursday, 6 September 2007
Creativity has undergone a transformation, according to one of Australia’s most innovative cultural critics who will discuss the role of creativity at a free public lecture at The University of Western Australia next week.

Writer, teacher, editor, film-maker, curator and multi-media producer Professor Ross Gibson credits developments in digital technology with changing his own art.

Mystery of blackleg resistance revealed

Wednesday, 5 September 2007

Canola breeders will soon know for the first time exactly how host resistance in their varieties responds to the fungal parasite that causes blackleg disease of canola crops across Australia.

The most damaging disease of canola worldwide, blackleg caused the total collapse of WA’s canola industry in the 1970s and remains the number one threat to canola production.

Mystery of blackleg resistance revealed

Wednesday, 5 September 2007

Canola breeders will soon know for the first time exactly how host resistance in their varieties responds to the fungal parasite that causes blackleg disease of canola crops across Australia.

The most damaging disease of canola worldwide, blackleg caused the total collapse of WA’s canola industry in the 1970s and remains the number one threat to canola production.

The University of Western Australia (UWA) Institute of Agriculture post-doctoral researcher, Dr Hua Li said canola breeders and growers had not known how the blackleg parasite overcame resistance.