Mathematical modelling suggests 'strategic' seradella

Wednesday, 7 November 2007
Like playing chess, outwitting annual ryegrass, a major weed in WA which can develop resistance to more than one herbicide at a time, requires constant vigilance and a strategic approach.

Farmers now have a greater understanding of the value of pasture phases for controlling herbicide-resistant annual ryegrass in low to medium rainfall areas, thanks to Graeme Doole from the School of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Institute of Agriculture, at The University of Western Australia (UWA).

Noongar people team with UWA to look back in time

Tuesday, 6 November 2007

Noongar people who are descendants of some of the earliest inhabitants of south-western Australia are learning about the lives their ancestors might have led, with help from a team of archaeologists at The University of Western Australia.

Dr Joe Dortch from UWA is part of an Australian Research Council linkage project to explore the ways Noongar people have changed the landscape over the past 6000 years.

Learn about the ghost in your genes at UWA

Saturday, 3 November 2007

New cancer treatments that are much less toxic to the patient have resulted from the latest research into the complexity of the disease. In the last few years, scientists and doctors have found that tiny chemical tags in our bodies, which researchers call ‘ghosts’, accumulate over time and turn genes on or off.

Stanford University hosts UWA's SymbioticA

Friday, 2 November 2007

Stanford University plays host to SymbioticA’s co-founder and Artistic Director Oron Catts, and Academic Co-ordinator Ionat Zurr, for four weeks, in an exciting, ground-breaking, and innovative exchange between Stanford University and The University of Western Australia.

UWA's SymbioticA on show in San Francisco

Friday, 2 November 2007

San Francisco is showcasing SymbioticA’s highly acclaimed research group the Tissue Culture & Art Project’s latest artwork, NoArk. Held at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, BioTechnique features an international selection of artworks that have been “grown” rather than manufactured.

Peter Nobel (BBCS)

Peter brings a breath of fresh air to asthma research

Monday, 29 October 2007

It's not every day researchers can say their latest study has caught the eye of international experts in their field. It happens even less frequently that successive offerings attract attention – especially when that work has been done by a PhD student. However, Peter Noble can make those claims after two of his published studies on asthma attracted favourable comments.

Professor Andrew Page

The psychology of treatments

Monday, 29 October 2007

Associate Professor Andrew Page, from the UWA School of Psychology, aims to improve mental health treatments through collaborations between researchers and clinical staff.

Research gives swimmers a kick-start

Monday, 29 October 2007

Human Movement and Exercise Science (HMES) researchers are cementing the school's reputation as a world leader in swimming biomechanics.

Matt Keys and Andrew Lyttle aim to help swimmers achieve the maximum kick from their underwater kicking to gain a winning edge. Professor Brian Blanksby, Head of the HMES School, said 0.2 seconds could be the difference between a gold medal and last place. "Swimmers shave or wear high-tech bodysuits and work constantly on their technique to gain crucial seconds," he said.

Centre for Forensic Science: Fingerprinting Graffiti Tags

Monday, 29 October 2007

Postgraduate student Genevieve Rowles is working hard to make graffiti a rarity rather than a fact of modern city life, as part of her Master's degree in forensic science.

Ms Rowles is studying graffiti tags to find a way of identifying the perpetrators and eventually building a statewide database of offenders and their tags. She says a common defence among taggers is to admit to one offence but deny multiple tags, claiming them to be forgeries. Her aim is to be able to disprove that tags can be forged, so that offenders can be prosecuted for multiple tags.

Going Straight

Monday, 29 October 2007

The starting block at the School of Human Movement and Exercise Science looks much like any other – but it is the first of its kind in the world and is helping swimmers get a head start in the pool.

Researchers at the School are using a specially-designed starting block to help elite swimmers go straight from the start of the gun.

The block, which cost more than $20,000, has been divided into two, with two force plates that can separately measure the forces coming from each foot when swimmers launch themselves into water.