David Hodgkinson

From the Warden: What Convocation does

Thursday, 21 June 2012

One of Convocation's major roles is to support and assist students and graduates of The University of Western Australia, and we do this in a number of ways.

Associate Professors Christine Howitt and Robert Faulkner

The last word: …or should that be the first word?

Wednesday, 13 June 2012

Ever stopped to consider the most significant event or time in your education?

David Enright: Student Adviser, Science Student Office/first year maths teacher

Does technology mean just skipping lectures?

Friday, 18 May 2012

I'm coming back from what I believe was a successful lecture, when I run straight into one of my students whom I know was supposed to be in the class.

I ask the student: "Why were you not there in my riveting calculus class?" The response ... "I no longer bother to attend lectures; it is a better use of my time to watch the recorded lecture that is posted later online for free viewing ..."

Carolyn Oldham was the first woman to be made Winthrop Professor in Engineering

Gen Y offers us our best chance at excellence

Friday, 23 March 2012

Just as women used to sit in groups weaving together, more than 100 women (and men) at UWA sat together in the Tropical Grove, listening to Carolyn Oldham weave together the threads of her vision for a resilient and excellent university.

E/Prof Max Kamien

UWA Emeritus Professor Max Kamien says Craig Thomson saga shows doctors’ certificates a sick joke

Thursday, 22 March 2012

Labor MP Craig Thomson is the latest Australian worker to be stung by the outdated culture of medical certificates. Mr Thomson fell ill with abdominal pain and was issued a medical certificate that would keep him from Federal Parliament.

Karl-Heinz Wyrwoll

How Aboriginal burning changed Australia’s climate

Thursday, 12 January 2012

For thousands of years, Aboriginal Australians burned forests to promote grasslands for hunting and other purposes. Recent research suggests that these burning practices also affected the timing and intensity of the Australian summer monsoon.

Googling the past: how I uncovered prehistoric remains from my office

Wednesday, 11 January 2012

Archaeology is the study of the remains of the past but has long been predatory on the sciences and their ever-growing technologies. I was brought up as a student in 1970s Britain, when we learned of the wonderful revelations to be made through aerial viewing of almost any human landscape.

Killing the Kodak moment … is the iPhone really to blame?

Monday, 9 January 2012

According to the Wall Street Journal, camera manufacturer Kodak is preparing to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, following a long struggle to maintain any sort of viable business.

David Glance

Top ten tech predictions for 2012 … and how to interpret them

Wednesday, 4 January 2012

Around this time of year you see plenty of articles (such as this one) reflecting on notable technologies and events of the year now gone. Such pieces will also attempt to predict the events of the year just started.

Christine Bryant First Year Adviser, Diversity and Transition Student Services

Finding the ideal job

Thursday, 1 December 2011

A Love Affair

Confucius philosophised that if you find the job you love you'll never work a day in your life. Although inspirational and, on first glance, straightforward, the sad truth is that doing what you love is the dream of many, but the reality of few. Approximately one year ago I went from being one of many to one of the select few.