Rizwana Abdul Azeez

Radicalisation Blog Series: Implementing ‘Pluralism’

Friday, 7 June 2019

What about efforts at counter-radicalisation in societies with  a prevailing commitment to managing social, ethnic and religious diversity? This should involve operationalising pluralist ideas so as to address sources of alienation. Singapore’s mosque-based educational policy program is examined here by Rizwana Abdul Azeez. She argues this program falls short, serving to minoritise Islam and the country’s Muslims with potential unintended consequences. Shamit Saggar


Raafia Raees Khan

Radicalisation Blog Series: Sabaoon - De-radicalisation through a Compassionate Approach

Friday, 7 June 2019

De-radicalisation is a broad term that comprises many ideas and practical actions. It is important to examine what is involved at a more granular level and here Raafia Raees Khan describes a specific, multi-faceted program in Pakistan’s Swat Valley in the country’s far north. There may be scope for policy learning and borrowing for other countries, including multi-ethnic, multicultural societies such as Australia. Shamit Saggar


Professor Michele Grossman

Radicalisation Blog Series: Michele Grossman examines the perceived asymmetry between Islamist-inspired and far-right violent extremism

Friday, 7 June 2019

The nature of radicalisation is changing rapidly. The phenomenon is increasingly atomised, nested in grievances, motives and everyday lives that are difficult to penetrate for policymakers. Here Michele Grossman examines these shifts and the perceived asymmetry between Islamist-inspired and far-right violent extremism. She concludes that a credible strategy to tackle these challenges relies, more than ever, on community based responses alongside criminal justice ones. Shamit Saggar


Leila Ben Mcharek

Radicalisation Blog Series: The advent of political Islam and the rise of radicalism

Friday, 7 June 2019

Radicalisation in contemporary Tunisia has emerged as an important flashpoint, spilling out of the Arab Spring. The impacts have been felt across the Middle East and Europe, and most notably the rise of ISIS. Leila Ben Mcharek looks here at the radicalisation of Tunisian youth and the way in which the energy of the original revolution became diverted towards jihadist militancy. The example contains important lessons about the spread of extremism through deliberate and non-deliberate forces. Shamit Saggar


Professor Shamit Saggar

Radicalisation Blog Series: Shamit Saggar examines Islamist-inspired radicalisation and violence

Friday, 7 June 2019

Evidence about Islamist-inspired radicalisation and violence

- Shamit Saggar


Almost two decades on from 9/11 a substantial body of research knowledge has been gathered about the nature of Islamist-inspired radicalisation and violence in western countries. This contains many rich points of relevance to policymakers, and quite a lot that is not so obviously useful. So what is known and what insights for policy have resulted?

There are three areas in which there have been important breakthroughs in the evidence base informing policy formulation.

Professor Samina Yasmeen

Radicalisation Blog Series: Introduction by Shamit Saggar and Samina Yasmeen

Friday, 7 June 2019

Introduction

Samina Yasmeen (UWA Centre for Muslim States and Societies) and
Shamit Saggar (UWA Public Policy Institute)

Michael Schaper

Our speaker discusses the policy and research gap between government and academia

Wednesday, 15 May 2019

The common mantra of research-led universities today is twofold: that they are here to advance the frontiers of knowledge and here to serve society. The latter is laudable, for sure, and speaks to a key rationale behind the UWA Public Policy Institute. But what is standing in the way of the best minds working successfully with government, commerce and non-profit organisations? Michael Schaper, a former Australian national regulatory tsar, reflects on the obstacles and suggests that we are headed in the right direction. Shamit Saggar

Our speaker examines the recent Indonesian elections

Monday, 29 April 2019

In her interim account of the recent Indonesian elections, Ella S. Prihatini points to significant levels of volatility in parties’ vote share, important breakthroughs by some new parties and the unprecedented fatigue created by a single-day electoral event. Shamit Saggar


Dr Glenn Savage

Our speaker examines schooling policy and the federal election

Wednesday, 17 April 2019

As Australia heads to the polls next month, we begin to look at key issues voters will consider. Here, Glenn Savage (UWA) argues that while the main parties emphasise quality and standards, their means of doing so (in terms of funding, autonomy, curriculum and leadership) vary considerably. Shamit Saggar


Brexit

UWA PPI Director discusses the Brexit challenge

Monday, 15 April 2019

Brexit without a decent rule-book

I find myself surprisingly stuck on Brexit. The inconclusive struggles thus far cast a light in the dark corner of how the UK is governed, relying on a part-written, uncodified constitution. It does not seem fit for purpose now that the limits of the political system have been tested. This is a conclusion I had not expected to draw.