Pea in maze

Study reveals plants 'listen' to find sources of water

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

A study led by The University of Western Australia has found plants have far more complex and developed senses than we thought with the ability to detect and respond to sounds to find water, and ultimately survive.

Pheromones

Do pheromones exist in humans?

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have conducted a study to test if the chemicals androstadienone (AND) and estratetraenol (EST) (commonly thought to be pheromones in humans) are pheromones and have found no evidence that they are.

Dr Shanta Barley

New study finds overfishing of sharks may have already impacted our coral reefs

Thursday, 23 February 2017

A study by marine biologists at The University of Western Australia has found that fishing by Indonesian shark hunters may have resulted in changes to fish communities on a major reef off Western Australia’s North-West coast.

Honey bees

Bees give up searching for food when we degrade their land

Wednesday, 8 February 2017

A new study into honey bees has revealed the significant effect human impact has on a bee’s metabolism, and ultimately its survival.

Ruby seadragon

Researchers capture first glimpse of ruby seadragons in the wild

Friday, 13 January 2017

A scientific expedition off the coast of Western Australia led to researchers from The University of Western Australia, the Western Australian Museum and Scripps Institution of Oceanography catching a rare glimpse of the newly discovered ruby seadragon in the wild.

Smart plants learn new habits

Tuesday, 6 December 2016

A new study led by The University of Western Australia has demonstrated for the first time that plants can learn about their environment by making links between events, an ability thought to be exclusive to animals.

DNA

Science event brings to life the fascinating world of biology

Friday, 12 August 2016

The weird and wonderful world of biology will be on display at a series of free workshops and events open to the public at The University of Western Australia on Saturday 20 and Sunday 21 August, as part of National Science Week.

Bee

Male bees fight back against STDs

Tuesday, 2 August 2016

Scientists at The University of Western Australia are a step closer to protecting honey bees from a widespread disease that causes dysentery and weakens hives considerably.

Great white shark

Shark Shield proves effective in deterring white sharks

Monday, 4 July 2016

Shark researchers at The University of Western Australia have released the final test results of a study that examined the effectiveness of the Shark ShieldTM shark deterrent.

Brain Bee finalists

St Hilda's student wins WA's Brain Bee Challenge

Monday, 27 June 2016

Mosman Park student Tatiana Kurniawan will represent Western Australia at the Australian Brain Bee Challenge national final to be held in Hobart in December after outsmarting 82 fellow Year 10 students in today’s State final held at The University of Western Australia.

Students during last year's Brain Bee

Western Australia's best young brains to battle it out

Monday, 20 June 2016

Western Australia’s brainiest Year 10 students are preparing for the competition of their young lives to determine who will represent the State at the Australian Brain Bee National Challenge.

Crocodile

New look at crocodile eyes

Thursday, 5 May 2016

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and Macquarie University have discovered that the visual systems in crocodiles are more cleverly designed than previously thought, allowing them to quickly adapt to their environment and facilitating their ‘ambush’ hunting techniques and semi-aquatic lifestyles. 

Rowan Lymbery

Scientists discover new way of testing reproductive compatibility

Tuesday, 29 March 2016

Scientists from The University of Western Australia have discovered a new way of measuring the effectiveness of different sperm competing to fertilise eggs in blue mussels.

Ozren Bogdanovic and Ryan Lister in a zebrafish research facility

Gene switch makes us look like our animal cousins

Tuesday, 1 March 2016

An international team of biologists has discovered how the same genes are turned on in mammals, fish and amphibians early in embryonic development, making them look incredibly similar for a brief period of time.

Hot spots

UWA expert says more 'green' needed to cool Perth's suburban hotspots

Thursday, 4 February 2016

An environmental engineering expert at The University of Western Australia said ‘greening’ the suburbs of Perth will help reduce the emerging urban health crisis of heatwaves.

New monitoring technologies needed to let wildlife off the hook

Wednesday, 23 December 2015

The creation of a new generation of major marine reserves will require innovative new monitoring techniques to understand the impact of these reserves on oceanic biodiversity, according to a new study led by The University of Western Australia.

Dr Mark Waters

Crop productivity and WA heritage winners in latest ARC funding

Wednesday, 16 December 2015

A project led by Dr Mark Waters from UWA to find new ways to improve crop productivity and one by UWA’s Professor Alistair Paterson to help preserve the heritage of the state’s north-west are winners in the latest round of funding grants from the Australian Research Council (ARC).

Zebrafish

Research offers new insight into light detection in vertebrates

Friday, 16 October 2015

Research carried out by scientists from The University of Western Australia, the University of Oxford and University College London will help better understand how light detection works in vertebrates.

Three minute thesis

Young scientist wins UWA's three minute thesis competition

Friday, 11 September 2015

Imagine trying to explain in just three minutes a complicated thesis that would normally take about nine hours to read.

Arctic expedition Lara Gracia-Corral

Arctic study finds CO2 helps plants grow but only at low temperatures

Wednesday, 2 September 2015

A new international study involving researchers from The University of Western Australia has found that carbon dioxide (CO2) has a positive effect on producing organic material at low temperatures in the Arctic Ocean, but that this effect disappears once temperatures increase.